Being Good Sport How to Teach Winning Versus Losing Visual

$3.50

Help your child or students understand what be good sport means and how to handle winning and losing when playing with others. Great support tool for how to deal with temper tantrums.

 

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Description

This winning versus losing visual aide set was a request from a parent of three boys with autism who needed help being good sport when losing.

These monitoring scales provide detailed explanations of how to deal with temper tantrums when playing or competing with others.

Three different charts highlight important characteristics of winners and losers, and provide realistic strategies and scripted phrases that can be used during competition.

 

This Winning vs Losing and Being Good Sport set includes

  • When You Are Winning Visual Explanation Page
  • When You Are Losing Visual Explanation Page
  • Winning Versus Losing Explanation Chart
  • 3 Versions of the Good Sport Monitor with printable arrows
  • How to Directions

 

The three different versions of a “Good Sport Monitor” are laid out in a leveled behavior scale.

This visual gives students the understanding of their behaviors in relation to the acceptance of others.

I highly recommend using any visuals as a teaching tool during a calm, relaxed setting before utilizing them in a heated situation.

Provide your student with the opportunity to discuss the charts, act out examples, observe others, or participate in video modeling.

Once comfortable with the charts, they will be much more successful when an actual situation occurs.

Directions: Print the chart or charts that best your student or students.

I use the small one for students to keep at their work areas, in their folders or even wear on a lanyard around the neck.

Also, I use the larger ones at a personal work space or stored in an accessible spot so I can utilize them during teaching times.

Glue the printed chart on construction paper or cardstock. Laminate and cut out.

Use the supplied arrow and tape it to a clothespin.

This allows the teacher to move the arrow to the appropriate volume category.

If a clothespin is to cumbersome, use a paperclip to easily move around.

The Being Good Sport visual scales and monitoring guides are useful tools for both general education students and students with learning disabilities including autism, Aspergers, ADHD, or emotional disability.

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Being Good Sport How to Teach Winning Versus Losing Visual

$3.50

Help your child or students understand what be good sport means and how to handle winning and losing when playing with others. Great support tool for how to deal with temper tantrums.

 

Description

This winning versus losing visual aide set was a request from a parent of three boys with autism who needed help being good sport when losing.

These monitoring scales provide detailed explanations of how to deal with temper tantrums when playing or competing with others.

Three different charts highlight important characteristics of winners and losers, and provide realistic strategies and scripted phrases that can be used during competition.

 

This Winning vs Losing and Being Good Sport set includes

  • When You Are Winning Visual Explanation Page
  • When You Are Losing Visual Explanation Page
  • Winning Versus Losing Explanation Chart
  • 3 Versions of the Good Sport Monitor with printable arrows
  • How to Directions

 

The three different versions of a “Good Sport Monitor” are laid out in a leveled behavior scale.

This visual gives students the understanding of their behaviors in relation to the acceptance of others.

I highly recommend using any visuals as a teaching tool during a calm, relaxed setting before utilizing them in a heated situation.

Provide your student with the opportunity to discuss the charts, act out examples, observe others, or participate in video modeling.

Once comfortable with the charts, they will be much more successful when an actual situation occurs.

Directions: Print the chart or charts that best your student or students.

I use the small one for students to keep at their work areas, in their folders or even wear on a lanyard around the neck.

Also, I use the larger ones at a personal work space or stored in an accessible spot so I can utilize them during teaching times.

Glue the printed chart on construction paper or cardstock. Laminate and cut out.

Use the supplied arrow and tape it to a clothespin.

This allows the teacher to move the arrow to the appropriate volume category.

If a clothespin is to cumbersome, use a paperclip to easily move around.

The Being Good Sport visual scales and monitoring guides are useful tools for both general education students and students with learning disabilities including autism, Aspergers, ADHD, or emotional disability.

Preview

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.

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